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Title IX Laws:Discrimination and Harassment - Know Your Rights

What is Title IX?
Title IX is a federal law that was passed in 1972 to ensure that male and female students and employees in educational settings are treated equally and fairly. It protects against discrimination based on sex (including sexual harassment). In addition, Title IX protects transgender students and students who do not conform to gender stereotypes. State law also prohibits discrimination based on gender (sex), gender expression, gender identity, and sexual orientation.
 
Student Rights Under Title IX
Federal Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (“Title IX”), implemented at 34 C.F.R. § 106.31, subd. (a), provides that no person shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any academic, extracurricular, research, occupational training, or other education program or activity operated by a recipient which receives federal financial assistance. Title IX requires school districts to take immediate and appropriate action to investigate when it knows or reasonably should know of a possible Title IX violation.
 
Title IX Coordinator
Meghan C. Daun

Human Resources Specialist 
50 Church Street
Quincy CA 95971

Email: mdaun@pcoe.k12.ca.us

Phone: 530-283-6500 x5224

Fax: 530-283-3776

Filing a Title IX Complaint
Any parent, guardian, individual, organization has the right to file a written complaint of discrimination, harassment, intimidation, and/or bullying on the basis of a protected characteristic within six months from the date the alleged incident occurred or the complainant first obtained knowledge of the facts of the alleged incident.

Within 60 days from the date of receipt of the complaint, the district shall conduct and complete an investigation of the complaint and prepare a written decision. During this process, the person responsible for the filing of the complaint is to be given the opportunity to provide evidence he/she believes supports the allegations. The district decision should include: (1) findings of fact; (2) conclusions of law; (3) disposition of the complaint; (4) the rationale for such disposition; (5) corrective actions, if necessary; (6) notice of the right to appeal the district’s decision to the California Department of Education (CDE) within 15 days; and, (7) the procedures to be followed to initiate such an appeal. If the school district fails to follow any of these rules a complaint can be filed directly with the CDE.


Complaints pertaining to Title IX issues should be filed by using the Uniform Complaint Procedures (UCP) as identified in California Code of Regulations, Title 5, Sections 4600 et. seq. For more information on the UCP complaints and appeals visit the CDE’s Uniform Complaint Procedures and Resolution of Discrimination/Harassment Complaint pages.

Further Resources